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Posts Tagged ‘st-8300M’

Cocoon Nebula (IC5146) Widefield

January 24, 2016 1 comment

I used the snow day here in the northeast to get started on the backlog of raw data from the fall that I haven’t processed.  This is the Cocoon Nebula, with its dark nebula friend, Barnard 168.

Cocoon FINAL v2

I actually took a full night’s worth of H-alpha data, but decided to use only the RGB data here, as a slight misalignment of the telescope shooting the H-alpha would have required a different cropping of the image.

Image data:

  • Exposures:  15×10 min R, G; 18×10 min B (2×2 binning) – total exposure time:  8 hours
  • Telescope: William Optics Star71 (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M
  • Mount: Takahashi EM200
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  good transparency, calm winds
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker -> PixInsight -> Photoshop
  • Date: Sep 14 and 17, 2015

The Pleiades (M45)

January 10, 2016 Leave a comment

Somehow, I’ve never really captured an image of The Pleiades (M45). Such a bright target directly overhead, but I was mostly looking for narrowband objects instead, I suppose.

Pleiades final 8x10 crop

This image was processed entirely in PixInsight, except for the final rescaling and jpeg conversion.  I’m moving more in that direction. Frustrating and unforgiving it is, but powerful.  For such a bright object, the dust makes it more challenging to process than I’d expected.

Image data:

  • Exposures: 20×10 min L (1×1 binning), 8×10 min each R, G, B (2×2 binning) – total exposure time:  7h 20m
  • Telescopes: Two William Optics Star71s (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M and QSI 583wsg
  • Mount: Takahashi EM200
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  fair transparency, calm winds
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker -> PixInsight
  • Date: Jan 2, 2016

The Heart Nebula, IC1805, in Narrowband

January 27, 2015 Leave a comment

This is one of my favorite deep sky objects, especially for narrowband.  It just fits on an KAF-8300 chip at 350 mm focal length.  The small cluster in the core is Melotte 15.

I took three nights of exposures, which were spread over 41 days due to poor weather and holiday trips.  Maybe next year when Cassiopeia swings into view, I’ll make a similar project of the Soul Nebula nearby.

The Heart Nebula (IC1805)

The Heart Nebula (IC1805)

Image data:

  • Exposures: 32 hours total: 96 x 10 min Ha, 43 x 10 min OIII, 53 x 10 min SII
  • Telescopes: Two William Optics Star 71s (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M and QSI 583wsg, 2×2 binned
  • Mount: CGEM
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  mild winds on two nights
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker -> PixInsight -> Photoshop
  • Date: Nov 21 2014, Dec 31 2014, and Jan 1 2015

The Cone Nebula/Fox Fur Nebula/NGC2264 Area

January 24, 2015 Leave a comment

Between snow storms, I’ve been able to squeeze in the occasional night of imaging.  It was a less than ideal night–poor seeing and all sorts of polar alignment issues plagued me–but I’m please to finally have an image of the Cone Nebula… or Fox Fur Nebula if you prefer…or Christmas Tree Cluster.  Whatever you call it, putting NGC2264 (the cluster) into your goto mount will get you there.

Somehow, I’ve never captured this one before.  That region of the sky has so many highlights (M42, IC2177, The Rosette, Horsehead…) it takes several years to get to them all.

Cone Nebula Widefield in H-alpha

Cone Nebula Widefield in H-alpha

Image data:

  • Exposures: 39 x 10 min H-alpha exposures
  • Telescopes: William Optics Star 71 (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M, 2×2 binned
  • Mount: CGEM
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  calm, but damp
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker -> PixInsight -> Photoshop
  • Date: Jan 22, 2015

A Quick Look at Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2

January 23, 2015 Leave a comment

It’s not often that we get a bright comet so high in the sky.  Luckily, I was able to seize a couple of hours of clear skies to image Comet Lovejoy while it was in Aries.  I took separate L, R, G, and B exposures across a 1×4 mosaic, since I knew the tail could be really long.  This extended tail was also very dim, barely showing with 3-minute exposures.  Because comets are moving targets, I only took a single 3-minute exposure for each channel, then moved the field of view.  You can actually see the effect of this movement a little in the head of the comet, where the L exposure came about 20 minutes after the R.

Comet Lovejoy, Jan 20, 2015

Comet Lovejoy, Jan 20, 2015

It’s easy to lose your sense of scale here.  This is a tremendous field of view.  Below is one of the uncropped mosaic images used to generate the above. Each of the four overlapping frames you see is 2.9 x 2.2 degrees, so the total field of view is around 7 x 3 degrees!

Uncropped mosaic view

Uncropped mosaic view

Image data:

  • Exposures: 1 x 3 min L, R, G, and B exposures in a four-part mosaic
  • Telescopes: William Optics Star 71 (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M, 2×2 binned
  • Mount: CGEM
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  calm
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker -> PixInsight -> Photoshop
  • Date: Jan 20, 2015

NGC7000

November 18, 2014 Leave a comment

This is not exactly a shining moment as an astroimager, because I completely messed up the polar alignment routine, resulting in smeared stars.  (When the CGEM tells you not to pick polar alignment stars too close to the pole, it means it!)  But NGC7000, more commonly known as the North America Nebula, is such a compelling object, I’m posting the image anyway.  It also gives a sense of how wide the field of view on the Star 71 is.

NGC7000 "The North America Nebula" in Narrowband

NGC7000 “The North America Nebula” in Narrowband

Image data:

  • Exposures: 34 x 10 min Ha, 14 x 10 min OIII, 17 x 10 min SII
  • Telescopes: Two William Optics Star 71s (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M and QSI 583wsg, 2×2 binned
  • Mount: CGEM
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  wind gusts over 20 mph, gibbous moon
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker, PixInsight, Photoshop
  • Date: Nov 2, 2014

Sh2-132 in Narrowband

November 7, 2014 3 comments

Both of my WO Star 71s are back from China (see previous post), cleaned, and as good as new.  Maybe better.  It took a few days after their return for some clear weather to arrive, but I was so happy to have them back.  William Yang was a good guy to deal with in this whole matter.

Sh2-132 is an odd nebula in that it can be hard to find.  Not so much because it’s not a reasonably bright narrowband target, but because it has no appeal to visual observers, so it’s not well-marked in most atlases.  Not all of the Sharpless objects are worthy targets (in fact the majority are duds), so it can be hard to tell that this one stands out from the emission nebula crowd.

It’s a photogenic target in the Hubble/SHO palette if you can take enough exposures to reveal the details, and several amateur images of it have popped up this season.  The SII is particularly dim, and if I could do it again, I would double the exposure time there.

Sh2-132 in the Hubble/SHO Narrowband Palette

Sh2-132 in the Hubble/SHO Narrowband Palette

Image data:

  • Exposures: 42 x 10 min Ha, 41 x 10 min OIII, 43 x 10 min SII
  • Telescopes: Two William Optics Star 71s (360mm f/5)
  • Cameras: SBIG ST-8300M and QSI 583wsg, 2×2 binned
  • Mount: CGEM
  • Guiding: QHY 5L-II mono, guided using PHD2
  • Conditions:  wind gusts over 25 mph… far from ideal
  • Processing: DeepSkyStacker, PixInsight, Photoshop
  • Dates: Oct 25-27, 2014
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